SEO tips for planning your recruitment website – how to build a sitemap

A website sitemap is critical to great recruitment website design. A sitemap is a file with a list of all the web pages accessible on your site, visible to both users and the crawler bots that search engines use to trawl and index site information.

Just as a map gives you directions to where you’re going, with an ‘X’ marking the destination, a sitemap does the same for a search engine, directing it to the available information on your site, and making it a simpler process to understand the details available on each page. The search engine can then begin to ‘learn’ how to index your site, before ranking it according to searcher intent. The bigger the site, the more useful a sitemap.

To give you an idea, here is an image of how a sitemap could be visualised. 

Visual example of a sitemap

Visual example of a sitemap

So, how can you start conceptualising your website with a sitemap in mind to help with SEO?

 

1) Clarify the purpose of your website

What are you aiming to achieve, and who is your target audience? You’re almost certainly already doing this, whether through your use of content or through your business’s LinkedIn profile, pitching yourself and your company with a specific image in mind. But approaching this from the purpose of a sitemap will help outline your calls to action as a business, and the CTAs the search engine will focus on.

 

2) Crawler bot pace

A well-organised sitemap will be easier for a crawler bot to read through, speeding up your appearance on search engines. But it’s a win-win situation, as a good sitemap will make for a happier bot too, making it more likely to rank you highly. Reverse Delta will always send a text version of the sitemap to Google anyway as best practice.

 

3) Site architecture

As recruitment website design experts, we at Reverse Delta know how to craft an optimised site that will fulfil your needs. But a great sitemap helps us optimise your site’s architecture from the ground up, leading to a smoother experience overall for everyone.

 

4) Avoid unindexed pages

Unindexed pages put simply, are those that can’t be found by a search engine. There are legitimate reasons to create unindexed pages, but for your purposes this is unlikely. An HTML sitemap means that the crawler bots can index and search your entire site, leaving no stone unturned.

 

5) Strong internal linking

Don’t just link to pages from the menu; also use “signposts” (eg icons, buttons or text links) on other pages, and text links (bonus points for having your keywords here) so there are multiple routes to your content.

 

6) Have an XML sitemap too

Google (and other search engines) like these – they’re not really for humans. Your web people can help here. Make sure they include links to your jobs.

 

7) Identify room for improvement

A good sitemap won’t just improve what’s already great about your site and your brand. It can help you see where there might still be work to be done — a dead-end here, a content-scarce section there, unclear CTAs (Call To Action) over here. Having a map doesn’t just show you a direction — it can show you where not to go as well.

 

8) Spread the word

Too easy to just leave it hanging there. Now to tell the bots. Get your sitemap submitted to the obvious places. Google’s Search Console, sure, but don’t forget Bing’s power – it’s often built into the ‘default’ service on all Windows devices, so their console counts. 

 

So if you’re thinking about building a website for your recruitment firm, why not spend a few minutes drawing out a likely sitemap and structuring how your site might look.

 

Feel free to get in touch with us to find out more about how we can help build your website here.