How to optimise your recruitment agency website for voice search

Following on from our recent blog post about Google for Jobs, we wanted to explore the idea of Google and the impact it has on the recruitment sector a little more.

Voice recognition is growing fast as the technology gets more sophisticated. Here are a few stats to back this up:

So you can see, voice-activated searches are massively on the rise, so if recruitment agencies want to ensure they are attracting active candidates for roles, it’s a good idea to optimise your recruitment agency website to make sure you’re coming up in the growing number of voice-activated searches. Content marketing and making sure you’ve got a good basis for SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) within your recruitment agency website will be critical if your recruitment agency is going to perform well in voice-activated search.

Back to basics – understand your customer

This sounds really obvious, but it’s worth making sure that you REALLY understand your audience’s pain points and address them in your job posts and blog content. Attention spans are short, so you need to make sure you’re writing your content in a very clever way to make sure it appears in their search earlier, as it will get your website more traffic.

Use long-tail keywords

We don’t want to go too far into the tech elements of SEO (it’s very complex), but in simple terms, you can write ‘long tail’ or ‘short tail’ keywords in order to help people search for your content.  

Long tail keywords: “How can I find a digital marketing job in Central London?”

Short tail keywords: “Marketing job London.”

You can see here that the long tail version is more of a question and it uses How at the beginning, which is another good tip to make sure your jobs and content perform well in voice activated searches.

The short tail version is much briefer and more along the lines of how somebody would type a search into a search engine. Research shows that people ask their device question in the long tail format, so it’s wise to make sure your web copy and job descriptions reflect this. Write your job descriptions to include “how, what, why and when” if you can, but not as the opening sentence. Also build landing pages for popular job searches, that aim to answer questions. Want to know more about the ‘Question’ schema? Talk to us. 

Location, location, location

We’ve touched on this already, but for your job ad to be successful, it needs to have an accurate location included so that you maximise your position on Google.

Make the most of the inbuilt SEO of your site

We’ve written countless articles on how to present jobs well for search engines, and writing well-formed descriptions and job titles following simple rules is an area worth investing your time in.  

What is the impact for recruitment agencies?

We’re inclined to say that voice search is unlikely to replace text search, but it’s worth making sure that you’re optimising the opportunity.

Voice activated search has become a fast growing trend and there is the potential that the upward trend could go downwards at some point. So, our advice would be to keep a watching brief on it, utilise voice activated search if you can, but don’t forget going back to basics by following some of the tips in this blog.

We’d also say that some of the voice activated software can bring about results that are dubious in terms of quality.  Our team had a bit of fun recently playing around with different devices and seeing what came up:

Dave Bancroft – Managing Director

Dave asked Siri (on Mac OS) to “Find me a project manager job in London.”

Siri didn’t find any matching positions.

He also asked Siri to find a project manager vacancy in London. Again, he didn’t get any matches.

Dave also asked Alexa Dot (via iOS App):

Find me a project manager job in London

“Bong” – nothing

Find me an IT recruitment agency in London

Alexa reads these out on the Dot, and displays them in the app.  Misheard as “ITV”. Results are poor!

Dave Haygarth – Operations Director

Dave tested Google Assistant via the Android app. His results varied:

“Find me a job in marketing in Blackburn” got good results as a job type and a location was included, but the results showed up trainee, executive and manager level roles.

His next search was “Find me a job in Digital Marketing” which was more specific, but wouldn’t be useful unless you were looking nationally.

“Find me a job” was a very vague search and resulted in Ad based posts only.

Are you using voice-activated search in your recruitment agency? What results are you finding? We’d love to hear from you – put your comments in the blog and we can do a follow up with some insight from the sector.